Energy as a Service Market

Energy as a Service Market by Type (Energy Supply Services, Operational and Maintenance Services, and Energy Efficiency and Optimization Services) End-User (Commercial and Industrial) and Region - Global Forecast to 2027

Report Code: EP 6429 Sep, 2022, by marketsandmarkets.com

[193 Pages Report] The global energy as a service market is expected to grow from an estimated USD 64.7 billion in 2022 to USD 105.6 billion by 2027, at a CAGR of 10.3% during the forecast period. The growth of the market can be attributed to the increasing distributed energy resources, new revenue generation streams for utilities. Also, decreasing cost of renewable power generation and storage solutions and increase use of energy-efficiency technology to drive the demand for energy as a service in the near future.

Energy as a Service Market

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COVID-19 Impact

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had an adverse effect on the global economy as the governments were forced to implement lockdown measures to prevent the spread of the virus. The impact of COVID-19 has also highlighted the need for better risk management and greater preparedness, and resilience. The pandemic was a big disruptor that has created challenges but also opportunities for the sector. Technology solution provider such as Siemens had and continue to face number of supply chain constraints, especially in the areas of base metals (copper, aluminum, steel), plastics, semiconductors, and transportation services. Electricity demand dropped quickly across Europe and India with confinement measures. Electricity demand in China dropped under lockdown in January 2020, and more strongly in February (-13% compared to February 2019). Therefore, drop in electricity demand adverserly affected the market.

Energy as a Service Market Dynamics

Driver: Increasing distributed energy resources

Electricity is primarily generated by large power plants. These plants are owned and operated by utilities or other independent power producers. This centrally generated electricity is then distributed across the country or state-wide grids of transmission & distribution lines and substations. As DER technologies improve and costs continue to decrease, the grid evolves. The electricity grid comprises many small, decentralized microgrids that give customers greater control over their electricity source and also provides greater reliability.

The transformation of the electric power industry from the traditional ways has led to the increase in the use of Distributed Energy Resources (DER), such as onsite solar panels, combined heat and power, fuel cells, and batteries. The increasing drive to reduce carbon emission from the power supply, improving low-cost technologies, declining costs of DER, and the urge to respond faster to customer needs and expectations are driving the increase in the use of distributed energy resources.

Reduced prices of distributed energy resources have positively impacted the energy as a service ecosystem, and several utilities can help bring down their customer’s energy costs by shifting from traditional to distributed energy resources. For instance, SmartWatt, a US-based company, collaborated with Plumas Lake School District to develop a roof-mounted solar PV system at 3 schools, which contributed to 100% of the facilities’ total energy consumption and saved the customer USD 180,000 in annual savings.

Restraints: Integration and deployment challenges

The deployment of various renewable energy sources has its own technical and feasibility considerations. They also have some capacity constraints, such as restricted supplies of basic raw material inputs, limitations on manufacturing capacity, competition for larger construction project management and equipment, and a limited trained workforce. For instance, the successful deployment of solar PV depends on factors such as the amount of sunlight available and solar radiation; this poses a threat to the energy as a service providers.

The major players, though having strong operational capabilities, have faced problems in the execution of energy as a service projects. For example, the capacity addition of 41,110 MW was planned, against which only 21,180 MW was achieved, i.e., the achievement of merely 51.5% against the set target. Several diverse and emerging technologies, such as connected devices and monitoring platforms, need to communicate seamlessly with each other to achieve energy cost savings through constant monitoring and automation. In addition, environment clearances and land acquisition have been the major issues for the delay in project execution. For instance, if a customer has already deployed smart lighting, energy as a service provider could face trouble integrating the same with their platform for analyzing and automating the same using their proprietary platform. Hence, there is a need for a streamlined business process, effective controls, and transparency.

Opportunities: Increasing use of energy-efficient technologies

Energy efficiency is the utilization of energy in the most cost-effective manner, whereby energy waste is minimized, and the overall consumption of primary energy resources is reduced. Technological advances in renewable assets lead to increased energy efficiency. Building owners find energy as a service model advantageous as the energy service providers bundle smaller project opportunities into a single contract. The providers can implement the same retrofit in multiple buildings, which leads to saving time and human resources. For instance, in California, Redaptive collaborated with AT&T to upgrade more than 600 sites across 31 states with LED lighting and controls, generating annual energy savings of nearly USD 20 million. The energy as a service structure allows the flexibility to add new efficiency measures over time and increase the overall savings across the customer portfolio.

Similarly, in Texas, the General Services Administration (GSA) has awarded a USD 37.2 million contract to Siemens to increase energy efficiency at 3 buildings in the Great Lakes region. The ESPC covers 13 different projects. The contract covers the installation of 4 central heating and cooling plants, energy-efficient exterior lighting, and high-efficiency hot water boilers to help save money while meeting peak demand at the facilities.

Challenges: Uncertainty about agreement structure

The energy as a service model has strengthened the energy-efficiency market to upgrade the latest technologies with no upfront capital investment cost. Commercial building owners are hesitant to sign long-term financing contracts or service procurement agreements with energy as a service providers. As the energy as a service provider owns and maintains the energy equipment, customers may be uncertain about whether to treat the contract as a service agreement or a lease. Risk-averse customers may hesitate because they fear investing in an upgrade with the wrong cost, life span, or outcome. Education on energy as a service contract can help overcome the customers’ uncertainty and simplify communications among various departments that are involved in the decision process (e.g., finance, procurement, facilities, and operations departments).

Empowering policy and regulatory environments for energy efficiency provides support toward increasing levels of energy efficiency and results in the reduction of uncertainty among energy users. The legislation must be enacted within the framework of a national energy policy. Energy-efficiency programs diminish or remove barriers to cost-effective energy efficiency, assisting customers with their investment decisions. For instance, in the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 2006, various programs are helping customers save money and assisting utilities to avoid new investments in the energy system. Such well-designed programs have many elements and well-understood best practices. It is an important element that leads customers to participate and invest more in energy-efficiency measures to make an effective purchasing decision for equipment or buildings.

Market Map

Energy as a Service Market Size, and Share

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By Type, immunity from traditional grid constraints and energy resiliency are driving energy supply services segment in the market

Energy supply services refer to the idea where a building’s energy requirements are taken care of by an outside company, typically utilities or service providers. Utilities traditionally would provide electricity to a building at a rate based on the time of consumption, and there was not much a building owner could do to change their overhead energy costs. However, with technologies such as renewables witnessing robust deployment and efficiency enhancements, coupled with energy storage and distributed energy systems, this traditional model is being challenged, and now consumers can have greater control over their energy costs. One of the significant advantages of energy supply services is that it develops an energy portfolio that combines different energy sources to meet the customer’s energy and sustainability goals and guarantees the service at an annual cost

By End-User, commercial energy prices and increase in the energy consumption demand is expected to drive the commercial segment

The commercial segment includes establishments such as healthcare, educational institutions, airports, data centers, leisure centers, warehouses, hotels, and others. The US uses and produces different types and sources of energy, which can be grouped into general categories such as primary and secondary, renewable and non-renewable, and fossil fuels. Primary energy sources include fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas, and coal), nuclear, and renewable energy. Electricity is a secondary energy source that is generated (produced) from primary energy sources.

Electricity prices for the commercial sector are higher than in the industrial sector. Hence, customers are looking for a solution that helps them implement energy-efficiency projects with no capital expenditure and validate energy savings. Also, global energy consumption in buildings has decoupled from the growth in floor space and economic outputs. This shows that consumers and businesses can make use of energy services more efficiently and at a greater value. For instance, Edison was awarded an energy performance contract with the Putnam Valley Central School District to significantly improve the energy efficiency of the District’s buildings and infrastructure and slow the pace of escalating energy costs.

North America is expected to lead the energy as a service market globally, during the forecast period.

The utilities in the region are undergoing a major operational transformation which includes decentralization, digitization, and decarbonization. The major utility operators in the region are looking to operate in the energy as a service business model, which is further expected to transform the power utility operations in the region. One of the major drivers for the energy as a service business model in the region is the ability to incorporate technology, analytics, and personalized services for end-users. This trend is mostly driven by advances in building management technologies and the need for commercial and industrial consumers to reduce their energy cost and carbon emissions. In addition to this, energy as a service provides an opportunity for utility and energy service companies to fund, develop, and design energy projects and solutions that can save energy.

North America’s electrical transmission infrastructure is unprepared for modern threats and natural hazards. Energy as a service would provide the flexibility and reliability that would enable expanded use of electricity across the region without getting affected by the threats and hazards. The region is also witnessing the rapid implementation of distributed energy systems that include solar, small-scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, and energy storage systems that would help the utilities to enable continuity of operations.

Energy as a Service Market Size, and Share

Key Market Players

The major players in the global energy as a service market are ENGIE (France), Enel X (Italy), Schneider Electric (France), Ameresco (US), Siemens (France), General Electric (US), Veolia (France), Honeywell (US), Centrica (Netherlands), Alpiq (Switzerland) and others.

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Scope of the Report

Report Metric

Details

Market Size available for years

2020–2027

Base year considered

2021

Forecast period

2022–2027

Forecast units

Value (USD)

Segments covered

Type, End-User

Geographies covered

Asia Pacific, North America, Europe, Middle East & Africa, and South America

Companies covered

ENGIE (France), Enel X (Italy), Schneider Electric (France), Ameresco (US), Siemens (France), General Electric (US), Veolia (France), Honeywell (US), Centrica (Netherlands), Alpiq (Switzerland), WGL Energy (US), Orsted (Denmark), Bernhard Energy Solutions (US) and others

This research report categorizes the energy as a service market based on type, end-user and region.

Based on Type, the market has been segmented as follows:

  • Energy Supply Services
  • Operational & Maintenance Services
  • Energy Efficiency and Optimization Services

Based on End-User, the market has been segmented as follows:

  • Commercial
  • Industrial

Based on Region, the market has been segmented as follows:

  • North America
  • Asia Pacific
  • South America
  • Europe
  • Middle East & Africa

Recent Developments

  • In July 2022, Ameresco entered into a long-term energy as a service (EaaS) agreement with Northwestern University. The partnership will help the institution address its energy-related deferred maintenance challenges with no up-front capital required while advancing its sustainability and academic goals.
  • In June 2022, Ameresco entered into a long-term energy as a service (EaaS) agreement with Northwestern University. The partnership will help the institution address its energy-related deferred maintenance challenges with no up-front capital required while advancing its sustainability and academic goals.
  • In May 2022, GE Digital acquired Opus One Solutions to power the energy transition. Opus One DERMS is designed to be an end-to-end modular Distributed Energy Resource Management System (DERMS) that can help utilities on their Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) journey to keep the grid safe, secure, and resilient while enabling energy affordability and customer participation in power generation/contribution..
  • In August 2021, ENGIE and Google signed a 24/7 carbon-free energy supply agreement in Germany. The 3-year agreement will contribute to Google’s 2030 Carbon-Free Energy (CFE) target for its data centers, cloud regions, and offices worldwide. ENGIE will assemble and negotiate an energy portfolio to supply Google with renewable power (solar and wind) to ensure that all its German operations are nearly 80% carbon-free by 2022.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION (Page No. - 23)
    1.1 STUDY OBJECTIVES
    1.2 DEFINITION
    1.3 INCLUSIONS AND EXCLUSIONS
           1.3.1 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY TYPE
           1.3.2 MARKET, BY END USER
           1.3.3 MARKET, BY REGION
    1.4 MARKET SCOPE
           1.4.1 MARKET SEGMENTATION
           1.4.2 REGIONAL SCOPE
    1.5 YEARS CONSIDERED
    1.6 CURRENCY CONSIDERED
    1.7 LIMITATIONS
    1.8 STAKEHOLDERS
    1.9 SUMMARY OF CHANGES

2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (Page No. - 28)
    2.1 RESEARCH DATA
           FIGURE 1 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET: RESEARCH DESIGN
    2.2 DATA TRIANGULATION
           2.2.1 MARKET ANALYSIS THROUGH PRIMARY INTERVIEWS
                    FIGURE 2 DATA TRIANGULATION METHODOLOGY
           2.2.2 SECONDARY DATA
                    2.2.2.1 Key data from secondary sources
           2.2.3 PRIMARY DATA
                    2.2.3.1 Key data from primary sources
                    2.2.3.2 Breakdown of primary interviews
                               FIGURE 3 BREAKDOWN OF PRIMARY INTERVIEWS: BY COMPANY TYPE, DESIGNATION,  AND REGION
    2.3 MARKET SIZE ESTIMATION
           2.3.1 BOTTOM-UP APPROACH
                    FIGURE 4 MARKET SIZE ESTIMATION METHODOLOGY: BOTTOM-UP APPROACH
           2.3.2 TOP-DOWN APPROACH
                    FIGURE 5 MARKET SIZE ESTIMATION METHODOLOGY: TOP-DOWN APPROACH
           2.3.3 DEMAND-SIDE METRICS
                    FIGURE 6 MAIN METRICS CONSIDERED WHILE ANALYZING AND ASSESSING DEMAND FOR ENERGY AS A SERVICE
           2.3.4 CALCULATION FOR DEMAND-SIDE METRICS
           2.3.5 RESEARCH ASSUMPTIONS FOR DEMAND-SIDE METRICS
           2.3.6 SUPPLY-SIDE ANALYSIS
                    FIGURE 7 KEY STEPS CONSIDERED FOR ASSESSING SUPPLY-SIDE OF MARKET
                    FIGURE 8 ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS MARKET: SUPPLY-SIDE ANALYSIS
                    2.3.6.1 Supply-side calculation
                    2.3.6.2 Assumptions for supply side
           2.3.7 FORECAST
    2.4 RESEARCH LIMITATIONS

3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Page No. - 39)
    TABLE 1 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET SNAPSHOT
    FIGURE 9 NORTH AMERICA DOMINATED ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET IN 2021
    FIGURE 10 ENERGY SUPPLY SERVICES EXPECTED TO HOLD LARGER MARKET SHARE BETWEEN 2022 AND 2027
    FIGURE 11 COMMERCIAL SEGMENT PROJECTED TO LEAD MARKET FROM 2022 TO 2027

4 PREMIUM INSIGHTS (Page No. - 42)
    4.1 ATTRACTIVE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MARKET PLAYERS IN ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET
           4.1.1 DECREASING COST OF RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION AND STORAGE SOLUTIONS TO DRIVE MARKET FROM 2022 TO 2027
    4.2 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY REGION
           FIGURE 12 MARKET IN ASIA PACIFIC TO GROW AT HIGHEST CAGR DURING FORECAST PERIOD
    4.3 NORTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY TYPE AND COUNTRY, 2021
           FIGURE 13 ENERGY SUPPLY SERVICES AND US HELD LARGEST MARKET SHARES IN  NORTH AMERICA
    4.4 MARKET, BY TYPE
           FIGURE 14 ENERGY SUPPLY SERVICES EXPECTED TO ACCOUNT FOR LARGER MARKET SHARE IN 2027
    4.5 MARKET, BY END USER
           FIGURE 15 COMMERCIAL SEGMENT PROJECTED TO DOMINATE MARKET IN 2027

5 MARKET OVERVIEW (Page No. - 45)
    5.1 INTRODUCTION
    5.2 MARKET DYNAMICS
           FIGURE 16 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET: DRIVERS, RESTRAINTS, OPPORTUNITIES,  AND CHALLENGES
           5.2.1 DRIVERS
                    5.2.1.1 New revenue generation streams for utilities
                    5.2.1.2 Increasing distributed energy resources
                               FIGURE 17 GLOBAL ANNUAL INSTALLED SOLAR CAPACITY FROM 2011 TO 2021 (GW)
                    5.2.1.3 Decreasing cost of renewable power generation and storage solutions
                               FIGURE 18 GLOBAL AVERAGE INSTALLED COST FOR SOLAR PV, 2010–2020  (USD PER KILOWATT)
                    5.2.1.4 Availability of federal and state tax benefits for energy-efficient projects
           5.2.2 RESTRAINTS
                    5.2.2.1 Integration and deployment challenges
                    5.2.2.2 Dominance of existing centralized utility models
           5.2.3 OPPORTUNITIES
                    5.2.3.1 Deeper operational and maintenance savings
                               TABLE 2 RECENT ILLUSTRATIONS OF OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES BY MAJOR PLAYERS
                    5.2.3.2 Increasing use of energy-efficient technologies
                               TABLE 3 POTENTIAL LIST OF EFFICIENCY MEASURES IN END-USE SECTORS
           5.2.4 CHALLENGES
                    5.2.4.1 Uncertainty about agreement structure
                    5.2.4.2 Building ownership constraints
    5.3 COVID-19 IMPACT
    5.4 MARKET MAP
           FIGURE 19 MARKET MAP: ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET
           TABLE 4 MARKET PLAYERS: ROLE IN ECOSYSTEM
    5.5 VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS
           FIGURE 20 VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS: ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET
           5.5.1 ENERGY AS A SERVICE SOLUTIONS ARCHITECT & PROJECT DEVELOPERS
           5.5.2 MARKET OPERATIONS
           5.5.3 ONGOING MANAGEMENT
           5.5.4 END USERS
           5.5.5 POST-SALES SERVICES
    5.6 PORTER’S FIVE FORCES ANALYSIS
           FIGURE 21 PORTER’S FIVE FORCES ANALYSIS FOR MARKET
           TABLE 5 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET: PORTER’S FIVE FORCES ANALYSIS
           5.6.1 THREAT OF SUBSTITUTES
           5.6.2 BARGAINING POWER OF SUPPLIERS
           5.6.3 BARGAINING POWER OF BUYERS
           5.6.4 THREAT OF NEW ENTRANTS
           5.6.5 INTENSITY OF COMPETITIVE RIVALRY

6 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY TYPE (Page No. - 60)
    6.1 INTRODUCTION
           FIGURE 22 ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET, BY TYPE, 2021
           TABLE 6 MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    6.2 ENERGY SUPPLY SERVICES
           6.2.1 ENERGY RESILIENCY AND IMMUNITY FROM TRADITIONAL GRID CONSTRAINTS
                    TABLE 7 ENERGY SUPPLY SERVICES MARKET, BY REGION, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    6.3 OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES
           6.3.1 ASSET LIFECYCLE ENHANCEMENT AND PREVENTION OF DOWNTIME
                    TABLE 8 OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES MARKET, BY REGION,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    6.4 ENERGY-EFFICIENCY AND OPTIMIZATION SERVICES
           6.4.1 INCENTIVES FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND NEED TO REDUCE ENERGY CONSUMPTION
                    TABLE 9 ENERGY-EFFICIENCY AND OPTIMIZATION SERVICES MARKET, BY REGION,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)

7 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY END USER (Page No. - 66)
    7.1 INTRODUCTION
           FIGURE 23 COMMERCIAL SEGMENT DOMINATED MARKET IN 2021
           TABLE 10 MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    7.2 COMMERCIAL
           7.2.1 INCREASING DEMAND FOR ENERGY AND RISING COMMERCIAL ENERGY PRICES
                    TABLE 11 COMMERCIAL: MARKET, BY REGION, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    7.3 INDUSTRIAL
           7.3.1 INCREASE IN PRODUCTION ACROSS INDUSTRIES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY-EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS
                    FIGURE 24 ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY INDUSTRIAL SEGMENT FROM 2012–2025
                    TABLE 12 INDUSTRIAL: MARKET, BY REGION, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)

8 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY REGION (Page No. - 71)
    8.1 INTRODUCTION
           FIGURE 25 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET SHARE, BY REGION, 2021 (%)
           FIGURE 26 ASIA PACIFIC MARKET TO REGISTER HIGHEST CAGR FROM 2022 TO 2027
           TABLE 13 MARKET, BY REGION, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    8.2 NORTH AMERICA
           FIGURE 27 NORTH AMERICA: ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET SNAPSHOT
           8.2.1 BY TYPE
                    TABLE 14 NORTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.2.2 BY END USER
                    TABLE 15 NORTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.2.3 BY COUNTRY
                    TABLE 16 NORTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY COUNTRY,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.1 US
                               8.2.3.1.1 Need to reduce carbon footprint and increase energy efficiency
                    8.2.3.2 By type
                               TABLE 17 US: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.3 By end user
                               TABLE 18 US: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.4 Canada
                               8.2.3.4.1 Need for clean energy future and reduction of long-term energy demand
                    8.2.3.5 By type
                               TABLE 19 CANADA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.6 By end user
                               TABLE 20 CANADA: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.7 Mexico
                               8.2.3.7.1 Rise in number of policies to support energy infrastructure growth and rising demand for renewable energy
                    8.2.3.8 By type
                               TABLE 21 MEXICO: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.2.3.9 By end user
                               TABLE 22 MEXICO: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    8.3 ASIA PACIFIC
           FIGURE 28 ASIA PACIFIC: ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET SNAPSHOT
           8.3.1 BY TYPE
                    TABLE 23 ASIA PACIFIC: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.3.2 BY END USER
                    TABLE 24 ASIA PACIFIC: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.3.3 BY COUNTRY
                    TABLE 25 ASIA PACIFIC: MARKET, BY COUNTRY, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.1 China
                               8.3.3.1.1 Extensive energy consumption in hard-to-abate sectors to drive market growth
                    8.3.3.2 By type
                               TABLE 26 CHINA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.3 By end user
                               TABLE 27 CHINA: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.4 Japan
                               8.3.3.4.1 Increasing energy prices and need to reduce dependency on imported fuels
                    8.3.3.5 By type
                               TABLE 28 JAPAN: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.6 By end user
                               TABLE 29 JAPAN: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.7 Australia
                               8.3.3.7.1 Grid reliability and need for energy-efficiency projects
                    8.3.3.8 By type
                               TABLE 30 AUSTRALIA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.9 By end user
                               TABLE 31 AUSTRALIA: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.10 Rest of Asia Pacific
                    8.3.3.11 By type
                               TABLE 32 REST OF ASIA PACIFIC: MARKET, BY TYPE,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.3.3.12 By end user
                               TABLE 33 REST OF ASIA PACIFIC: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    8.4 EUROPE
           8.4.1 BY TYPE
                    TABLE 34 EUROPE: ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.4.2 BY END USER
                    TABLE 35 EUROPE: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.4.3 BY COUNTRY
                    TABLE 36 EUROPE: MARKET SIZE, BY COUNTRY, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.1 Germany
                               8.4.3.1.1 Need to adopt renewable energy sources and reduce carbon emissions
                    8.4.3.2 By type
                               TABLE 37 GERMANY: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.3 By end user
                               TABLE 38 GERMANY: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.4 Italy
                               8.4.3.4.1 Development of sustainable energy sector and need to reduce energy cost
                    8.4.3.5 By type
                               TABLE 39 ITALY: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.6 By end user
                               TABLE 40 ITALY: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.7 UK
                               8.4.3.7.1 Need for energy security and volatile energy prices
                    8.4.3.8 By type
                               TABLE 41 UK: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.9 By end user
                               TABLE 42 UK: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.10 France
                               8.4.3.10.1 Investments in renewable technologies and growing demand for renewable power
                    8.4.3.11 By type
                               TABLE 43 FRANCE: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.12 By end user
                               TABLE 44 FRANCE: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.13 Spain
                               8.4.3.13.1 Growing need to maintain grid stability and increase energy efficiency
                    8.4.3.14 By type
                               TABLE 45 SPAIN: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.15 By end user
                               TABLE 46 SPAIN: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.16 Rest of Europe
                    8.4.3.17 By type
                               TABLE 47 REST OF EUROPE: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.4.3.18 By end user
                               TABLE 48 REST OF EUROPE: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    8.5 MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA
           8.5.1 BY TYPE
                    TABLE 49 MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA: ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY TYPE,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.5.2 BY END USER
                    TABLE 50 MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.5.3 BY COUNTRY
                    TABLE 51 MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA: MARKET, BY COUNTRY,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.5.3.1 Saudi Arabia
                               8.5.3.1.1 Shift to non-oil-based economy and need for renewable power generation
                    8.5.3.2 By type
                               TABLE 52 SAUDI ARABIA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.5.3.3 By end user
                               TABLE 53 SAUDI ARABIA: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.5.3.4 South Africa
                               8.5.3.4.1 Grid connectivity and policy support for energy-efficiency measures
                    8.5.3.5 By type
                               TABLE 54 SOUTH AFRICA: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.5.3.6 By end user
                               TABLE 55 SOUTH AFRICA: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
    8.6 SOUTH AMERICA
           8.6.1 BY TYPE
                    TABLE 56 SOUTH AMERICA: ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.6.2 BY END USER
                    TABLE 57 SOUTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY END USER,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
           8.6.3 BY COUNTRY
                    TABLE 58 SOUTH AMERICA: MARKET, BY COUNTRY,  2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.6.3.1 Brazil
                               8.6.3.1.1 Need to tackle power outages is driving market
                    8.6.3.2 By type
                               TABLE 59 BRAZIL: MARKET, BY TYPE, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)
                    8.6.3.3 By end user
                               TABLE 60 BRAZIL: MARKET, BY END USER, 2020–2027 (USD MILLION)

9 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE (Page No. - 101)
    9.1 KEY PLAYERS’ STRATEGIES
           TABLE 61 OVERVIEW OF KEY STRATEGIES DEPLOYED BY TOP PLAYERS,  JANUARY 2018 – JUNE 2022
    9.2 MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS OF TOP FIVE PLAYERS
           FIGURE 29 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS, 2021
    9.3 KEY COMPANY EVALUATION QUADRANT
           9.3.1 STARS
           9.3.2 PERVASIVE PLAYERS
           9.3.3 EMERGING LEADERS
           9.3.4 PARTICIPANTS
                    FIGURE 30 COMPETITIVE LEADERSHIP MAPPING: MARKET, 2021
    9.4 ENERGY AS A SERVICE MARKET: COMPANY FOOTPRINT
           TABLE 62 COMPANY FOOTPRINT: BY END USER
           TABLE 63 COMPANY FOOTPRINT: BY TYPE
           TABLE 64 COMPANY FOOTPRINT: BY REGION
           TABLE 65 OVERALL COMPANY FOOTPRINT
    9.5 COMPETITIVE SCENARIO
           TABLE 66 ENERGY AS A SERVICES MARKET: PRODUCT LAUNCHES, FEBRUARY 2020–JULY 2022
           TABLE 67 MARKET: DEALS, DECEMBER 2021–JULY 2022
           TABLE 68 MARKET: OTHERS, MAY 2020–APRIL 2022

10 COMPANY PROFILES (Page No. - 114)
(Business overview, Products/services/solutions offered, Recent Developments, MNM view)*
     10.1 INTRODUCTION
     10.2 KEY PLAYERS
             10.2.1 ENGIE
                       TABLE 69 ENGIE: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 31 ENGIE: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 70 ENGIE: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 71 ENGIE: DEALS
             10.2.2 ENEL X
                       TABLE 72 ENEL X: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 32 ENEL X: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 73 ENEL X: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 74 ENEL X: PRODUCT LAUNCHES
                       TABLE 75 ENEL X: DEALS
                       TABLE 76 ENEL X: OTHERS
             10.2.3 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
                       TABLE 77 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 33 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 78 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 79 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC: DEALS
             10.2.4 AMERESCO
                       TABLE 80 AMERESCO: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 34 AMERESCO: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 81 AMERESCO: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 82 AMERESCO: DEALS
             10.2.5 SIEMENS
                       TABLE 83 SIEMENS: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 35 SIEMENS: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 84 SIEMENS: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 85 SIEMENS: DEALS
             10.2.6 GENERAL ELECTRIC
                       TABLE 86 GENERAL ELECTRIC: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 36 GENERAL ELECTRIC: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 87 GENERAL ELECTRIC: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 88 GENERAL ELECTRIC: DEALS
                       TABLE 89 GENERAL ELECTRIC: OTHERS
             10.2.7 HONEYWELL
                       TABLE 90 HONEYWELL: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 37 HONEYWELL: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 91 HONEYWELL: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 92 HONEYWELL: PRODUCT LAUNCHES
                       TABLE 93 HONEYWELL: DEALS
             10.2.8 JOHNSON CONTROLS
                       TABLE 94 JOHNSON CONTROLS: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 38 JOHNSON CONTROLS: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 95 JOHNSON CONTROLS: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 96 JOHNSON CONTROL: PRODUCT LAUNCHES
                       TABLE 97 JOHNSON CONTROLS: DEALS
             10.2.9 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY
                       TABLE 98 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 39 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 99 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 100 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY: PRODUCT LAUNCHES
                       TABLE 101 EDF RENEWABLE ENERGY: DEALS
             10.2.10 EDISON
                       TABLE 102 EDISON: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 40 EDISON: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 103 EDISON: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 104 EDISON: DEALS
             10.2.11 ALPIQ
                       TABLE 105 ALPIQ: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 41 ALPIQ: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 106 ALPIQ: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 107 ALPIQ: DEALS
             10.2.12 VEOLIA
                       TABLE 108 VEOLIA: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 42 VEOLIA: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 109 VEOLIA: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 110 VEOLIA: DEALS
             10.2.13 ORSTED
                       TABLE 111 ORSTED: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 43 ORSTED: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 112 ORSTED: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 113 ORSTED: DEALS
                       TABLE 114 ORSTED: OTHERS
             10.2.14 CENTRICA
                       TABLE 115 CENTRICA: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       FIGURE 44 CENTRICA: COMPANY SNAPSHOT
                       TABLE 116 CENTRICA: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 117 CENTRICA: DEALS
             10.2.15 WGL ENERGY
                       TABLE 118 WGL ENERGY: COMPANY OVERVIEW
                       TABLE 119 WGL ENERGY: PRODUCTS/SERVICES/SOLUTIONS OFFERED
                       TABLE 120 WGL ENERGY: PRODUCT LAUNCHES
                       TABLE 121 WGL ENERGY: DEALS
                       TABLE 122 WGL ENERGY: OTHERS
     10.3 OTHER PLAYERS
             10.3.1 BERNHARD ENERGY SOLUTIONS
             10.3.2 ENTEGRITY
             10.3.3 SMARTWATT
             10.3.4 ENERTIKA
             10.3.5 NORSECO
             10.3.6 WENDEL ENERGY SERVICE
*Details on Business overview, Products/services/solutions offered, Recent Developments, MNM view might not be captured in case of unlisted companies.

11 APPENDIX (Page No. - 186)
     11.1 INSIGHTS FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS
     11.2 DISCUSSION GUIDE
     11.3 KNOWLEDGESTORE: MARKETSANDMARKETS’ SUBSCRIPTION PORTAL
     11.4 CUSTOMIZATION OPTIONS
     11.5 RELATED REPORTS
     11.6 AUTHOR DETAILS

This study involved four major activities in estimating the current size of the energy as a service market. Exhaustive secondary research was carried out to collect information on the market, peer market, and parent market. The next step was to validate these data from secondary findings, assumptions, and market sizing with industry experts across the value chain through primary research. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches were used to estimate the total market size. Later, the market breakdown and data triangulation were done to estimate the market size of the segments and sub-segments.

Secondary Research

The research study on energy as a service market involved the extensive use of directories, databases, and secondary sources, such as Hoovers, Bloomberg, Businessweek, UN Comtrade Database, Factiva, International Energy Agency, International Monetary Fund, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, US Energy Information Administration, BP Statistical Review of World Energy, US Energy Information Administration, European Committee of Electrical Installation Equipment Manufacturers, US Environmental Protection Agency, to identify and collect information useful for this technical, market-oriented, and commercial study. The other secondary sources included white papers, articles by recognized authors, annual reports, press releases & investor presentations of companies, certified publications, manufacturer associations, trade directories, and databases.

Primary Research

Primary sources included several industry experts from core and related industries, services providers, IoT and cloud-based solution providers, and utility provider related to all the segments of this industry’s value chain. Various primary sources from both the supply and demand sides of the market were interviewed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information. In the canvassing of primaries, various departments within organizations, such as sales, engineering, operations, and managers were covered to provide a holistic viewpoint in our report The breakdown of primary respondents is given below:

Energy as a Service Market Size, and Share

To know about the assumptions considered for the study, download the pdf brochure

Market Size Estimation

Both bottom-up and top-down approaches have been used to estimate and validate the size of the global energy as a services market and its dependent submarkets. Various sub-segments size in the market were also estimated by these methods. The research methodology used to estimate the market size includes the following:

  • The key players in the market have been identified through extensive secondary research, and their market share in the respective regions have been determined through both primary and secondary research.
  • The market’s value chain and size, in terms of value, have been determined through primary and secondary research processes.
  • All percentage shares, splits, and breakdowns have been determined using secondary sources and verified through primary sources.

Global Energy as a service Market Size: Bottom-Up Approach

Energy as a Service Market Size, and Share

To know about the assumptions considered for the study, Request for Free Sample Report

Data Triangulation

After arriving at the overall market size from the estimation process explained below, the total market has been split into several segments and subsegments. The data triangulation and market breakdown procedures have been employed, wherever applicable, to complete the overall market engineering process and arrive at the exact statistics for all the segments and subsegments. The data has been triangulated by studying various factors and trends from both the demand and supply sides. Along with this, the market size has been validated using both top-down and bottom-up approaches.

Report Objectives

  • To define, describe, segment, and forecast the energy as a services market by type, end-user and region based on market size and volume
  • To forecast the market size, in terms of value, for five key regions: North America, South America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East & Africa, along with their key countries
  • To strategically analyze the subsegments with respect to individual growth trends, prospects, and contributions of each segment to the overall market size
  • To provide detailed information about the key factors such as drivers, restraints, opportunities, and challenges influencing the growth of the market
  • To analyze market opportunities for stakeholders and details of the competitive landscape for market leaders
  • To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their market shares and core competencies
  • To analyze competitive developments, such as sales contracts, agreements, investments, expansions, new product launches, mergers, partnerships, joint ventures, collaborations, and acquisitions, in the market

Available Customizations:

With the given market data, MarketsandMarkets offers customizations as per the client’s specific needs. The following customization options are available for this report:

Geographic Analysis

  • Further breakdown of region or country-specific analysis

Company Information

  • Detailed analyses and profiling of additional market players (up to 5)
Report Code
EP 6429
Published ON
Sep, 2022
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